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Know your Recruiting ABP-C’s

No, that isn’t a typo – I didn’t mean to put ABC’s! Indulge me for a minute and I will tell you why. Back in January 2013, I blogged about what the key attributes are that exceptional recruiters possess. One of those attributes was the ability to effectively downstream candidates through the proverbial recruiting funnel. What I mean when I refer to “downstreaming” is the recruiters’ ability to pre-qualify a candidate by removing potential obstacles/barriers that would prevent the recruiter from actually closing the candidate with their client. The logic here is that by asking the right questions and removing obstacles (to closing), the recruiter then knows what they are up against from a timeline perspective and can also properly educate their clients if they are dragging their feet during the decision-making and offer process.

ABC BlockFor purposes of this post, I wanted to take this concept of downstreaming a bit further and hone in on one aspect of it that I feel is of utmost importance. Most of us are familiar with the (somewhat) famous scene from Glengarry Glen Ross where Alec Baldwin tries to “motivate” a sales team by getting them to focus on the concept of ABC – Always Be Closing (Warning – language alert if you choose to play this clip). The same applies to recruiters as well; however, I wanted to add one more letter to that acronym – a P. In this case, the “P” stands for “pre”, as in Always Be Pre- Closing. In the recruiting downstream funnel, it is of utmost importance that recruiters are always pre closing their candidates. In other words, recruiters need to be pre-closing during the downstream process vs. the actual offer process. The act of extending the offer should be merely a formality as it simply recaps all the previous discussions in a written and formal format. An effectively pre-closed candidate receives an offer with a response akin to “this is as we discussed, where do I sign?”

So the real key to not experiencing offer rejection is the discussion during theLetter P downstream process. As a recruiter, you cannot wait until your client (whether you are an in-house or agency recruiter) comes up with a formal written offer before presenting the terms to your candidate. You need to be discussing these items during the downstream process so that when you advise/work with you client to prepare the actual offer, it is reflective of what the candidate has discussed with you (and your client). A big part of your role as the recruiter is working with your candidate and client on the back and forth of potential terms so that the final offer is realistic (for both parties) and all the major stumbling blocks have been covered. So the real question is, what sorts of items should the recruiter be “pre-closing” their candidate on? Here is a simple checklist to keep you on track:

  1. Salary and other compensation – always one of the most important items but best to deal with it up front. You need to get a feel from your candidate what they are looking for and understand what your client is able to pay.  You need to find out what your candidate’s current comp is and work upward from there, especially if the job you are presenting to them represents some upward career movement and/or added responsibilities.  If the position involves a bonus structure, this should be discussed and pre-closed on too – i.e. What is the ceiling amount? How is it earned? How is it paid out?   You should also pre-close your candidate on overtime compensation for the position. i.e. Is there any? When does it kick in? Last but not least, if there is relocation compensation as part of the offer, this too needs to be discussed and your candidate pre-closed on how this will look (terms) in the offer.
  2. Overall benefits package – this is important to look at in terms of how it relates to the salary as well. Are there disability plans (short term/long term) as part of the package? Who pays for them? Is there a pension plan? Is there a matching RRSP program? All of these items can represent value as part of the offer – you just need to understand what is important to your candidate (and what your client can offer) and the pre-close accordingly.
  3. Title – this sounds silly but can be a stumbling block. It should be clear as to what the position title is going to be and at what level, organizationally speaking, it slots in at. Is it a Manager level job? Director? Other? Understand what is being offered so that there is no surprise in the written offer. I have seen far too many cases of everything else lining up but the actual title in the offer is off and it throws the entire process off track.
  4. Vacation allowance – this is a key element to be aware of both in terms of knowing what the candidate currently has vs. what your client may offer. It is hard for any candidate to take less vacation than they currently have. So know what your candidate has now and know what your client can offer. Often companies can’t/won’t move on salary (budget) but can/do move on vacation allowance.
  5. Professional development – what is being covered here? What needs to be covered? This can be anything from professional dues, tuition, conference fees, etc. but often are items of great importance to the candidate.
  6. Start date – another obvious but critical element. You need to understand when your candidate is able to leave their current job (what notice period they have to/want to provide) and when they can start the position you will ultimately offer them. Do they have vacation time they are looking to take /do they have a previously booked trip? Ask the questions and make sure that the start date in the offer is a start date that the candidate is comfortable with. You don’t want to get into a back and forth with the candidate and your client on start date – this is one of those items that can go off the rails pretty quickly.
  7. Spouse – while this has nothing to do directly with the offer, it has everything to do with offer rejection! Good recruiters always pre-close candidates with their spouses. That is, they make sure the candidate has discussed things with their husband/wife/partner to make sure that they are onboard with a potential change. Often the spouse is the true decision maker (i.e. household budgeter) and they need to be comfortable with what the offer will include. This factor is 10x more important when any offer involves relocation. If need be, get on the phone with the candidate and their spouse and pre-close them both together.

By taking the time to effectively pre-close candidates on these seven areas, your actual offer review/acceptance process will become a mere formality. In fact, by pre-closing on these key areas, your overall offer acceptance rate should dramatically increase and there will very few of those “surprise” offer rejections you may be seeing now. What about you? What other areas do you feel you need to pre-close candidates on? As always, I welcome your comments and feedback.

Block image courtesy of digitalart/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Letter P image courtesy of screations/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

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