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Focus on your SOB’s!

This title may be a bit misleading but it is great for marketing purposes! Traditional thinking is that, as a manager, you need to shift your focus and spend more of your time and energy focusing on your best people, so I can see why you would be confused if I am now telling you to focus on your SOB’s! I know what you are thinking – “but Scott, that isn’t what I call my poor performers! I can’t say that, I will get in trouble with HR!” I am sure you have other code names for them…but I digress.

Angry ManNo, in this case the SOB’s I want you to focus on are Specific, Observable, Behaviours. One of the biggest management challenges I see is the lack of feedback and performance based discussions that take place between a manager and their employees. Far too many managers and employees are quick to complain about their organization’s performance management system (justifiably so in most cases) as the source of all evil, when in fact, because the front end coaching and communication between manager and employee is so non-existent, the root cause lies there.

We tend to not equip our managers with the proper tools to actually communicate with and coach employees. They get bogged down in process, forms, compliance, complicated goals and objectives and pie in the sky metrics. The reality is that everything starts with having a conversation with your employees. Simply put, employees want and need feedback on their performance and the easiest way to do this is to focus on what you are observing (good or bad) as far as their behaviours and outcomes go. This generates conversation which leads to a coaching opportunity.

I am a firm believer in focusing on HOW work is done more so then so then WHAT work is done. I believe that if you have employees with the right approach to completing their work, you can always train them on skills gaps. Alternatively, you may have someone who delivers work of the highest quality; however, they are a complete a**hole to deal with and leave a trail of bodies behind them every day. This type of person is toxic and should not be in your organization – but that is a post for another day.

For most of us, we deal with folks who are somewhere in between these two ends of the spectrum. Most of the time they display the right approach to work and most of the time they deliver. Focusing on the specific behaviours you want to see is how you get your people going in the right direction – all of the time. Talk to them about HOW their work (goals) gets done (completed). Identify WHAT you want to see from them. Communicate and coach them on these behaviours. Coach up when they are demonstrating things you do not want to see. Coach for reinforcement when they display what you want to see.

When coaching, give examples – be SPECIFIC. Employees need to know EXACTLY what they are doing well and where they need to improve. The key to this is to identify, in advance, what successes looks like for that employee in that role. That is, as the manager, you need to identify what behaviours you want to see and outline what that looks like (success) – this way, the employee has a clear idea as to what the expected outcomes are and there won’t be any surprises when they receive feedback from you. Essentially, the pre-determined behavioural outcomes become your anchoring statements every time you coach. That is, you are always referring back to these as the game plan and deviations from the game plan are rooted in the coaching conversations you have with your staff.

So, if you are looking to simplify your coaching conversations with your staff, remember to focus on the SOB’s – Specific Observable Behaviours. With an acronym like that, you won’t ever forget! As always, I welcome your comments and feedback. Best of luck dealing with your SOB’s!

Photo courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net/imagerymajestic

The Art of the Skip Level – Redux

The #1 most read post on The Armchair HR Manager is “The Art of the Skip Level” from July 2014. It has had over 10,000 views on my website along with almost 18,000 views on LinkedIn. For little old me, those are some pretty good numbers!

Skipping Businessman

The best part about the post is the amount of comments, interaction and engagement I have had with my readers. I truly enjoyed the exchange of questions and ideas. To that extent, I have had so many questions and comments that I figured a follow up post on the subject matter would be appropriate. So, what I am providing now are some other key points to consider before and after you conduct a skip level meeting:

  1. How do I get the manager who is being “skipped” onside with this? Conversation is critical here. It is important to set the proper tone and let the manager know in advance how information that is gleaned from the skip level will be shared (with them) and actioned (when/where appropriate.) Involve the manager in the process because if you alienate them, the trust will be eroded. This part is really tough – I am not going to lie! Be upfront with them about the “why’s” in terms of why you are doing the skip level. You need to talk to them well in advance of conducting the skip level meeting. Often you can position the skip levels with a continuous improvement and/or employee engagement approach in mind. As well, you need to let the manager know that the skip levels are NOT going to be performance impacting. They are to be used as information gathering that will help you as their manager do a better job of coaching, developing and supporting them.
  2. To share or not to share, that is the question: My readership has often asked me if they should share the questions in advance that they are going to ask at a skip level. There are several things to consider with this question, beginning with, should you share with the employees and should you share with the manager who is being “skipped.” First and foremost, if you do in fact have a planned series of questions you want to ask (always a good idea) you need to share these with the manager being skipped. This will help alleviate a lot of the stress and anxiety they will likely be feeling, especially the first time you conduct a skip level. As well, it will help build trust with them as they will clearly see that there is nothing being “hidden.” The next consideration is whether or not you should share in advance with the employees that will be attending. The answer, as with all things HR, is that “it depends.” If the questions are going to be time consuming to read/understand, then yes, give them time in advance to read and contemplate. If you want the session to be fairly formal, and typically larger groups need more structure and formality in order to keep on track, then you should share the questions in advance. However, if your group is smaller and will lend itself to be more conversational in nature, there really isn’t a need to share the questions in advance. What is most important is that you focus on the “pulse” of things and let the conversation be a bit fluid; remember, it is all about creating dialogue.
  3. What is the most important thing to consider with regards to the employees AFTER the skip level is done? The single most important consideration with the employees is that you need to follow up with them, in relatively short order, with regards to what you are going to do in response to the information you received during the skip level and/or follow up with what you are going to do differently as a result of the skip level. You can’t commit to responding to everything, but you have to follow up with something, otherwise they will feel they wasted their time talking to you. It could even be as simple as committing to providing the generalized feedback to the manager within 1 week of the skip level being completed and letting employees know you will use the information to work with the manager to help improve BLANK at the workplace. Get some quick, easy wins out of things first. This builds credibility.
  4. What is the most important thing to consider with regards to the manager being skipped after the skip level is done? With regards to the manager, you need to follow up with them re. how the meeting went. If you picked up on some general themes (positive or negative) you need to have a discussion with them soonest. You have to remember, all that your manager is going to be doing, until they hear from you about the meeting, is THINKING about what might have been said at the meeting. They will want to know what was said, discussed, committed to, etc. You owe it to the manager to NOT leave them hanging.
  5. How do I avoid having done a skip level meeting not look like a “witch hunt”? The easiest and most effective way to avoid this scenario is to make conducting skip levels a regular event. If you only do them when something appears to be wrong (i.e. complaint driven, bad employee survey, etc.) then the manager being skipped will always feel like you are out to get them and won’t trust the process. However, if you do them on a regular basis (and regular can be the last Friday of every 4th month), then employees and your manager(s) will come to expect them as part of your regular feedback and improvement process. In other words, it will just be part of a regular day at the office.

Armed with this information, along with the information from the original post, you should be in great shape, pre and post skip level meeting, to utilize skip levels as a communication and improvement tool . Be open, honest and candid with your manager(s) and their employees. If you aren’t, no one will trust you or the process. If they don’t trust, you are wasting your time. As always, I welcome your comments and feedback.

Image courtesy of ambro/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Lead through, not in front of

Many years ago, when I was first starting out in HR, I received some great advice from a former boss of mine that has resonated throughout my entire career. She said to me, “in order to truly be effective, HR should be seen as being an understated function in its approach.” It took several years after getting that advice for the message to really sink in. Hey, I was only 25 at the time – I thought I knew everything!

As my career evolved, I not only tried to apply that advice to my HR practice (functionally) but also in my role as a (HR) leader. In fact, I try (notice I say, ‘try’) to not be “the guy” out in front of things all the time. The younger me liked the spotlight and always wanted it to be known that it was “my idea” or that I was “in charge” – whatever the hell that meant. As I matured (grew up) I learned that I could have greater success as a leader by leading through people as opposed to standing in front of them. In fact, I would probably say I became more comfortable and effective as a leader by learning to lead through others.

Leading through others

As an HR Pro and HR Leader, I try to be the person/department that helps enables key organizational activity and results through our people and managers. I firmly believe that by focusing my HR practice on being an enabling function, it truly places HR in its proper organizational role. Ultimately, any people solutions that we come up with will only be successful if understood and accepted as truly being a solution to a problem by our operations clients. This way, they become the ones that “own” the solution and are the ones in front of their people discussing why the latest, trendy HR initiative is a good thing for the company. I am being a bit facetious here but you get my point.

This entire concept really came full circle for me the other day as I was trying to dispense this very advice to a colleague (non-HR). As part of a cross functional team that is responsible for leading/driving an organizational change initiative, we came to a bit of a loggerhead as to how things should be executed at a front line operational level. I felt strongly that the team should help “enable” the change and our role would be to lead the change through others (i.e. Operations Directors/Managers). She felt the change was best led and driven by our change team, that is, we should be the ones at the podium (so to speak) discussing the change, speaking to the employees, being an ear for them and helping them understand the change.

My feeling was that we would hinder our success if we were positioned or seen as the group “in charge” of this. There was no need for us to be in front of this – we needed to lead through others. In this case, the “others” were our other organizational leaders whom, without their support, could cause this change initiative to not be successful. There was no doubt in my mind that if something was imposed on them without their involvement and without given them an opportunity to be leaders (and have us perceived as managing their people) this simply would not work.

As leaders, we have to check our ego at the door. Leading through others is NOT some sort of passive admission that we are poor leaders. As a leader, you have to be confident enough in your own abilities and know that you can effect change (and lead) without being “front and centre” on something. Leadership is NOT about your own personal pride, agenda, ego or self-recognition. It is about empowering others to take action because they want to and not because you “told” them to.

So, while my advice here applies to leaders in general, my hope is that my HR audience truly takes this to heart in their own HR practice(s) and that they focus on leading through others. I feel confident that if you take this approach, you will realize even greater success as an HR Pro and as an organizational leader. As always, I welcome your comments and feedback.

Image courtesy of sheelamohan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Do your Values MEAN anything?

Corporate Values

Company Values

What do those phrases mean to you? Does the organization you work for even have corporate values? If so, do you know what they are? Quickly…without looking. What are they? Or do you have to look at your intranet site or some chart on the wall? Unfortunately, in far too many companies, their values are simply a flashy poster on the wall. Lots of companies like to present themselves as having “strong corporate values that guide how we do things.” Prime example is Enron who, as part of their values, identified “Integrity – We work with customers and prospects openly, honestly, and sincerely.” We all know how that story turned out.

Values

On a more practical level, these are also the same companies that at the first sign of trouble do things that are the complete opposite of their “values.” For example, one company I know of quite well, that shall remain nameless, has a corporate value of “People” defined as, “Above all else, we value our people. They make the difference to the success of our organization and its customers.” This same company, back in 2009, at the first sign of some economic trouble, laid off 25% of its workforce. No other cost savings measures were looked at, but the knee jerk reaction was to conduct layoffs. This, coming from the company that values its people…see where I am going with this? To this day, 7 years later, they still have a tough time attracting people due to the damage done to their employment brand. Companies need to understand – people aren’t stupid. They see/know double speak when they hear it. They know when you are not being genuine.

At the end of the day, you are better off not having any type of values then marketing them and not following them. You see, when done right, your values will ultimately define a huge part of your workplace culture. So, a focus needs to be placed on bringing your company values to life. How do you make them real in your workplace? Are your managers and employees recognized, rewarded and compensated for displaying behaviours that directly support your values? Do people in your organization get promoted based on competency AND by living and demonstrating your company values? If the answer is “no” to any of those questions, your values will not be able to come to life and they certainly won’t define your culture. They are words on the corporate poster or something to go into a glossy shareholder report and nothing more.

Far too many companies fall into the trap of having very generic, catch-all types of values – Teamwork, Customer Service, Quality. Really? What do those mean? Those could be the values for a burger joint, a muffler shop, a clothing store or a software development company! Basically, any type of business could have those values – there is nothing in there that defines WHO you are as an organization. You really want to have values that help shape and define your culture and ultimately define your employment brand – then you need to make them mean something!

For example, how would you feel about working for a company that held values like this:

“We value getting sh*t done – we hate bureaucracy and red tape. We don’t like roadblocks impeding our employees’ success and we don’t micromanage. We hire good people and expect them to get sh*t done”

“Truth and Honesty – we don’t like liars and people who go back on their word. We value people who deliver the message straight up and never ever lie.”

Seriously though? Why can’t we have values like that? They mean something to the individual employee and they certainly help govern decision making. It is also pretty clear what kind of culture that company has – and if you like what you hear, that is probably a place you want to work. If you don’t like it, then you self-select out. Bottom line, by having real values that MEAN something for your company and its employees, you will have brought them to life and helped establish the type of workplace culture you desire. Don’t be generic. Be brave. Be bold. Be different. Live your values. Reward your employees that do the same. Establish the type of culture you want as an organization. Be a place where people WANT to come to work. As always, I welcome your comments and feedback.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Strategy is Crap

As part of my ongoing platform to help HR Pros focus on what is important, I wanted to take another stab at this whole “strategic” thing. As many of you know, I really get riled up about HR Pros always talking about the need to be “more strategic” and how they don’t feel as though they are adding value as an HR Pro if they aren’t being “strategic.” Truth of the matter is, would we even know if were being strategic if we were actually being strategic? Whoa…think about that!

Dog wasteAny who, my point is this – any company and/or department can have strategic plans. There are tons of companies out there that have developed great strategies for how they will grow and deliver their product or service. They spend days/weeks/months cobbling together beautiful PowerPoint presentations, hardbound strategy books and awesome spreadsheets in support of their strategy. At the end of the day, these strategies mean nothing if your culture is crap.

What I am getting at is that the more important, albeit more time consuming, focus for HR Pros and their company’s needs to be on improving their organizational culture. Think about it – you have a great strategic plan to grow your business by adding new product or service lines this year. All of which are predicated on having the right people in place. However, you have such a poor organizational culture that you are turning over 35% of your staff each year and your quality metrics are crap. Good luck executing on that strategic “plan.”

You want real change that will help support and grow the business? Then focus on culture. As an HR Pro, you want to add real value to your company? Take on the challenge of trying to change your organizational culture. If you need to focus organizationally on more of a quality mindset – then help lead the charge to make this shift. Apply your change management abilities and truly add value as a business partner. Need to shift to more of a performance management mindset? Be at the forefront of leading that change, working with managers and employees to shift their thinking and mindset and really try and make a difference.

Here is the thing – driving a culture change/shift is harder and takes longer then developing “strategy.” Don’t be fooled into thinking that developing a bunch of strategic plans will make you a better HR Pro or more valued. That is total rubbish – sink your teeth into something that really makes a difference. Once you have the right culture in place, you can then focus on your strategic plans because without the right supporting culture, strategy is crap. As always, I welcome your comments and feedback.

Photo courtesy of artur84/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

“HR – what are they good for?”

Unfortunately this was a quote I heard recently while shopping at my local grocery store. This was a large store which is part of an even larger chain of national stores. I overhead this conversation that two employees were having while working the fresh meal counter – the one that serves fresh, on the go lunch meals and basically competes with fast food outlets for business.

The conversation, from what I can tell, centered on the frustration that one employee was having about getting some issue resolved with their shift and subsequent pay – presumably as it pertained to company policy. They were looking for some guidance and support from HR in getting it resolved. I could tell from the conversation that their past experiences in going to HR for help were less than positive so they didn’t anticipate that this experience would be any different, hence the reason (I assumed) that they made that comment.

Stop Bad Habits

So, me, being the nosy HR person that I am and wanting to know the reason for this anti-HR sentiment quipped up with a, “why won’t you talk to HR and how come you feel this way about them?” Because I asked this in my usual (cough, ahem) charming way, the employees decided to actually answer me! In fact, they were only too happy to share their views on HR! Let’s see, I would summarize their feelings as follows:

  • HR is a faceless/nameless entity
  • HR doesn’t care about the employees, they feel they are only a nuisance
  • HR isn’t there to help them
  • It takes too long to get an answer out of HR and most things aren’t worth the fight
  • Half of the time HR doesn’t even know the answer to their question!
  • HR is basically incompetent

WOW! Not exactly a ringing endorsement for the profession is it? In the spirit of full disclosure, I told them that I work in HR for another company and was curious about their take on HR as, unfortunately, I hear this sentiment more often than I would like. They indicated that their feeling is simply more of a frustration of dealing with a faceless, nameless entity that simply doesn’t seem to be there to support them or answer their questions…nothing more, nothing less. They, along with many of their co-workers, were yet to have a “positive” experience with their HR department.

What a shame that our profession still has that, sometimes earned, reputation. How would you feel if employees in your organization described your HR department as being “useless?” If you were to anonymously poll employees at your company, what percent would say that HR doesn’t care about the employees, or isn’t there to help them? I worry it may be more then you/we realize.

I think that as a profession we need to take a serious look at these questions. Present company included, we all need to make sure we aren’t too comfortable in any ivory towers we have built and truly make sure we are positioning our HR departments in the proper way. It would kill me to hear employees in any company I worked for describe the HR department in any negative way, but the thing is you don’t know what you don’t know. So, I think we need to make sure we are always asking employees these questions and that we are prepared to hear the answer and improve accordingly. Let’s make sure that we are there to listen, advise and act when appropriate. Let’s help ENABLE our employees to be successful in their jobs – that is OUR job.

As is part of my HR stump speech, we are all in this together. HR Pros, let’s make sure we continue to unite as a profession and stamp out these negative perceptions that employees have of our profession. Better yet, let’s make sure we are not perpetuating the perceptions by engaging in the type of activity that causes employees’ to feel negatively about HR! As always, I welcome your comments and feedback.

 

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

LinkedIn Connection Requests – Don’t be THAT Guy!

I am as big a fan of LinkedIn as the next guy. I have found it to be a valuable tool to build my network, enhance my professional brand and recruit for my company. I would say that for many people, myself included, LinkedIn has been become a virtual extension of their professional persona. In fact, in many ways and depending on who is looking at my profile on LinkedIn, it IS my professional brand – at least at that moment in time.

So, my advice to people who are either on LinkedIn (but not actively managing their account) or are thinking about joining LinkedIn is to make sure that what you (eventually) portray on LinkedIn is in line with the professional brand/image you want to be identified with. In fact, because LinkedIn forms such a vital part of anyone’s professional network and image, I have blogged many times about proper LinkedIn etiquette on a variety of topics that can be found here , here, here, here, here and here.

Linkedin Meme

However, today’s topic is focused on one particular area of etiquette violation that seems to be an increasing trend on LinkedIn and that is the “Connect and Sell” request. For those that have received these types of requests and emails you know exactly what I am talking about. You receive a connection request from someone that you don’t know, in the spirit and intent of LinkedIn you accept the request, only to have this person minutes (maybe hours) later send you a sales pitch to either buy their latest piece of software/technology, use their recruiting services or subscribe to their training services. Sorry to pick on these folks but in my world that is what I experience. Seriously!? Is this how we do business now? There is no way that anyone can tell me that this approach works! I know what I do when I receive those requests…nothing. Yup, nada. In fact, it makes we want to “disconnect” with that person right away.

So, if you are one of the spammy spammers doing this – please stop.   No one appreciates this approach and it reflects poorly on your professional brand and probably your company. You are the source of memes everywhere. Think about it – if you were selling a software package to someone that you NEVER had any contact with before, would you walk up to them on the street and say, “Hi, my name is Joe from ACME Software. We have never met but I would like to meet you. Thank you, would you like to buy my software product?” It truly is as INSANE as it is written there!

Going forward, do yourself a favour. Use LinkedIn to make connections and build relationships. It is NOT there for you to use as a cold calling (cold emailing?) tool. Take some pride in what you do and how you define your professional brand because this approach reflects poorly on you. As always, I welcome your comments and feedback.

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